• Star Clusters

    Science Release: Merging galaxies break radio silence Science Release: Retirement in the suburbs Photo Release: Celestial fireworks celebrate Hubble’s 25th anniversary Science Release: Death of giant galaxies spreads from the core Photo Release: Hubble finds ghosts of quasars past Science Release: Dark matter even darker than once thought Science Release: An explosive quartet Photo Release: March of the moons Photo Release: The tell-tale signs of a galactic merger Photo Release: Revisiting an icon
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  • Picture of the Week

    The most crowded place in the Milky Way

    The most crowded place in the Milky Way

    This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image presents the Arches Cluster, the densest known star cluster in the Milky Way. It is located about 25 000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), close to the heart of our galaxy, the Milky Way. It is, like its neighbour the Quintuplet Cluster, a fairly young astronomical object at between two and four million years old. The Arches cluster is so dense that in a region with a radius equal to the distance between the Sun and its nearest star there would be over 100 000 stars! At least…

  • Our Solar System

    Hubble observation of aurorae on Ganymede Plot of the rocking of Ganymede’s magnetic field Ganymede’s magnetic field Artist’s illustration of aurorae and Ganymede Cutaway of the moon Ganymede Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — beginning of event Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — comparison of beginning and end of sequence, without annotations Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — beginning of event, annotated Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — end of event Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — comparison of beginning and end of sequence, with annotations Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — end of event, annotated Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — Comparison of beginning and end of sequence, including annotations